What are the implications of the Westinghouse nuclear plant in West Australia?

By Tim FarrarRead more article A report by the Australian Energy Market Operator (AEMO) into West Australia’s coal, gas and nuclear electricity generation has found the West Australian Government’s policy to convert the town’s electricity to renewables is unlikely to achieve its aims.

The report says that even with the addition of solar, wind and battery storage to the grid, it is unlikely that West Australia will be able to meet its 2030 target of 50 per cent renewable electricity by 2032.

The AEMO said the policy is unlikely even if the State Government and the Australian Bureau of Statistics were to publish a new target for 2030.

“We see the current policy as having a low likelihood of achieving the target,” the report states.

“The most likely scenarios in which the policy could be implemented are: The West Australian National Electricity Market is fully transitioned by 2030 and West Australia achieves a 50 per-cent renewable electricity mix by 2030; or West Australia does not achieve a 50-per-cent renewables mix by 2020 and the Government does not have the capacity to meet the 2030 target.”

The report said the introduction of more renewables and storage capacity would only increase the challenge of meeting the target by 2030.

West Australian Minister for the Environment Tim Nicholls said the report confirmed what the Government had been saying for some time, saying the Government has had discussions with all stakeholders.

“This report confirms what we have been saying all along, that it’s not about a 50/50 split, it’s about a strong grid,” he said.

The West Australian Power Corporation said it would not comment on the report, but said it was confident that it was in line with its commitment to reduce carbon emissions by 25 per cent by 2050.”

If you look at the coal-fired power stations that we have, we are not going to be able even to have 50 per per cent renewables in the electricity mix, we will only be able in the end to achieve a 70 per cent share of that by 2030.”

The West Australian Power Corporation said it would not comment on the report, but said it was confident that it was in line with its commitment to reduce carbon emissions by 25 per cent by 2050.

The company said it expected to be in a position to meet this target within 10 years.

Topics:energy,environment,coal-fired-power,climate-change,energy,state-parliament,energy-and-utilities,energypolicy,government-and.govt-and+-federal-government,environmental-policy,climate,government—business-economics-and_economics,environment-management,environmentAL,australia